Image of the Day: You Name the Cosmos

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Many of the recent discoveries by the Hubble Space Telescope have been "named" with numbers. Gone are the poetic, mythic names like Milky Way or Andromeda or Pegasus.

Let's have some fun and help NASA out and create names for these awesome celestial objects.

We'll select your best submissions and send them off to NASA headquarters.

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Image of the Day: The "Red Dwarf Galaxy"


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Many of the recent discoveries by the Hubble Space Telescope have been "named" with numbers. Gone are the poetic, mythic names like Milky Way or Andromeda or Pegasus.

Let's have some fun and help NASA out and create names for these awesome celestial objects.

We took poetic license and named today's pic pick the "Red Dwarf Galaxy." It's actual name is spiral galaxy NGC 5792 a typical spiral, almost edge-on, with blue spiral arms and some dust features, what is cool is its neighbor, a red dwarf that is actually part of the Milky Way. This M dwarfs are the most common type of star, making up about 75% of all stars in the Milky Way.

What's your name for this fascinating object?

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Image of the Day: You Name the Cosmos

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In further proof that the universe can kick our butt at just about anything, the double galaxies of NGC4676 are putting on a pyrotechnics display that Jerry Bruckheimer couldn't imagine if he mainlined LSD and directly applied two thousand volts to his visual cortex.  They're colliding in a process leading astrophysicists describe as "totally awesome".  They've got a sense of cinema style to it too, drawing the stellar spectacular out in extreme slow-motion - a few hundred million years, now showing in a cosmos near you. We think astronomers could do a better name these fantastic objects. What would you name them?

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Image of the Day: Red Saturn & Its Moon, Titan

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This strange, false-color image of otherwise familiar planet Saturn recorded from the Keck I telescope on Hawaii's Mauna Kea shows temperature changes based on thermal infrared emission in the gas giant's atmosphere and rings.  Based on the effects of sunlight during the southern summer season, general warming trends were anticipated. But a surprise was in store.

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Image of the Day: Space Observatories at Mauna Kea -World's Tallest Mountain

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The peak of Hawaii's Mauna Kea is 13,796 feet (4,205 m) above mean sea level but 33,476 feet (10,203 m) above its base on the floor of the Pacific Ocean makes it the world's tallest mountain, taller than Mount Everest, which is the highest mountain above sea level.

The summit of Mauna Kea houses the world's largest observatory for optical, infrared, and submillimeter astronomy. Click here and move your mouse over a dome to identify a telescope, then click on the dome to go to its website 

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