Alien Water Worlds --"Most Habitable Planets May Have Oceans Spanning 90% of Their Surface"

 

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When it comes to exploring exoplanets, it may be wise to take a snorkel along. A new study, published in a paper in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, has used a statistical model to predict that most habitable planets may be dominated by oceans spanning over 90% of their surface area.

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High-Mass Stars "Reveal Rate Black Holes, Neutron Stars and Supernovae Evolved in the Cosmos"

 

 

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The Large Magellenic Cloud embodies a phase of the universe prior to the Milky Way when the largest number of high-mass stars were formed. For this reason, its metallicity - the proportion of its matter made up of chemical elements different from hydrogen and helium, the primordial atoms that gave rise to the first stars - is only half that of the binaries found in the Milky Way, whose metallicity is very close to the Sun's.

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Earth-Impacting Asteroids --For the 1st Time, Scientists Rank Seven Most Threatening Effects

 

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Earth is struck by an asteroid 60 meters (more than 190 feet) wide approximately once every 1500 years, whereas an asteroid 400 meters (more than 1,300 feet) across is likely to strike the planet every 100,000 years. If an asteroid struck Earth, which of its effects--scorching heat, flying debris, towering tsunamis--would claim the most lives?

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"Beyond Carbon" --Life in the Universe (WATCH Today's 'Galaxy' Stream)

 

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we normally think of as 'life' is based on chains of carbon atoms, with a few other atoms, such as nitrogen or phosphorous, Stephen Hawking observed in his famous lecture, Life in the Universe.  We can imagine that one might have life with some other chemical basis, such as silicon, "but carbon seems the most favorable case, because it has the richest chemistry."

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Fabric of the Cosmos --"Much of What We Think About the Universe is Wrong" (WATCH Documentary)

 

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Episode One of The Fabric of the Cosmos, a four-hour series based on the book by renowned physicist Brian Greene, professor of physics and mathematics at Columbia University and the co-founder of the World Science Festival, who takes us to the frontiers of physics to see how scientists are piecing together the most complete picture yet of space, time, and the universe.

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Milky Way's Spherical Halo Reaches 10 to 30 Times Farther Out Than Distance Between the Galactic Center and the Sun

 

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Sometimes it takes a lot of trees to see the forest. In the case of the latest discovery made by astronomers at the University of Arizona, exactly 732,225. Except that in this case, the "forest" is a veil of diffuse hydrogen gas enshrouding the Milky Way, and each "tree" is another galaxy observed with the 2.5-meter telescope of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

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Astronomers Scan Thousands of Stars for Alien Laser Signals --"Each of Those Stars Could Host a Planet With a New York City, Paris, or Beijing"

 

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“Every single one of those stars could have a New York City, a Paris, a London, and we would have no idea,” Nate Tellis of the University of California, Berkeley says about the 5,600 stars scanned in a new study gathered by the Keck Observatory in Hawaii one of the world’s most powerful telescopes. Keck astronomers spent hours staring at the night sky in search of exoplanets and accumulating huge amounts of data about potential new worlds elsewhere in the Milky Way.

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USA's Space Race Revealed: "The Secret Reason for Creating NASA" (Startalk Radio with Neil deGrasse Tyson)

 

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Sputnik, Apollo, JFK, LBJ, Gagarin, Laika, von Braun. You know the speeches: “…We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, …” But do you know the reality? Find out when astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson interviews Prof. John Logsdon, an expert in the history of space exploration.

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New Discovery --"Potentially Doubles the Number of Supermassive Black Holes in the Universe"

 

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Three years ago, a University of Utah-led team discovered that an ultra-compact dwarf galaxy contained a supermassive black hole, then the smallest known galaxy to harbor such a giant black hole. The findings suggested that the dwarfs were likely tiny leftovers of larger galaxies that were stripped of their outer layers after colliding into other, larger galaxies.

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Dark Matter Particles That Make Up All Galaxy Halos --"Are Like a Swarm of Bees, Moving Chaotically"

 

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Dark matter extends far beyond the reach of the furthest stars in the galaxy, forming what scientists call a dark matter halo. While stars within the galaxy all rotate in a neat, organized disk, these dark matter particles are like a swarm of bees, moving chaotically in random directions, which keeps them puffed up to balance the inward pull of gravity.

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