Admissions to Singularity U -The World's Most Difficult?

Post-02-04-09-su2 Chris Harwick at wired.com just published a hilarious spoof admissions letter  (posted below) to the new Singularity University founded by Ray Kurzweil (The Singularity Is Near) and Peter Diamandis (X Prize). This new Google and NASA backed venture offers an interdisciplinary "graduate studies program" combining genetics, artificial intelligence, and engineering.

Anyone who complains about science not delivering it's promises simply doesn't comprehend how incredible this information age truly is: you can go to the mall RIGHT NOW and buy devices which would have reshaped the world ten years ago, are reshaping it today, and technology isn't slowing down - it's accelerating exponentially.  There are incredible innovations just around the corner and that's the thinking behind the creation of Singularity University.. 

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Space-Robot Designers Needed -"What Color's Your Spaceship?"

Login_pictA New Galaxy Series on Transforming Your Life for the 21st Century

One effect of the breakthrough technologies we report on is that you need breakthrough technologists to run them (at least until we get AI working).  It doesn't matter if "nanotech swarm handler" will one day be as boring as "windshield repair"  - what matters is that right now these things are awesome and you could get paid to do them.  The first job in our weekly What Color's Your Spaceship? career series is Off-World Robot Designer, a phrase so futuristic it might well jump off your monitor as a hologram.

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"What Color's Your Spaceship?" The problem with science education

Login_pict Science is the future.  In case you haven't noticed.  Just this last week we've seen people set up an interplanetary internet, merge nanotech with brain tissue and release plans for a space elevator.  The only thing we really know about the future is that we don't know what the hell it's going to be like, outside of "incredible."  So why are we preparing our kids for the past?

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