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January 2018
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Fingerprints Detected of Very First Stars --"Opens a New Window on Dawn of the Universe" (VIDEO)

 


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Now, after 12 years of experimental effort, a team of scientists, led by ASU School of Earth and Space Exploration astronomer Judd Bowman, has detected the fingerprints of the earliest stars in the universe. Using radio signals, the detection provides the first evidence for the oldest ancestors in our cosmic family tree, born by a mere 180 million years after the universe began.

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Today's "Planet Earth Report" --Ta-Nehisi Coates: 'Why I'm Writing Captain America, and Why it Scares the Hell Out of Me' (WATCH Video)

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Two years ago I began taking up the childhood dream of writing comics. To say it is more difficult than it looks is to commit oneself to criminal understatement. Writers don’t write comics so much as they draw them with words. Everything has to be shown, a fact I knew going into the work, but could not truly know until I had actually done it. For two years I’ve lived in the world of Wakanda, writing the title Black Panther. I’ll continue working in that world. This summer, I’m entering a new one—the world of Captain America.

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Infecting Our Solar System? --"SpaceX Red Tesla May Be the Largest Load of Earthly Bacteria to Ever Enter Space"

 

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"The load of bacteria on the Tesla could be considered a biothreat, or a backup copy of life on Earth," she said Alina Alexeenko, a professor of aeronautics and astronautics at Purdue, who works in a lab that specializes in freeze-drying bacteria and biologics. The freeze-drying technology is used for long-term preservation of live virus vaccines, bacteria and biopharmaceuticals – a process similar to what live organisms experience in space.

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EcoNews--"Wind and Solar Could Meet Most but Not All Electricity Needs"

 
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Wind and solar power could generate most but not all electricity in the United States, according to an analysis of 36 years of weather data by Carnegie's Ken Caldeira, and three Carnegie-affiliated energy experts: Matthew Shaner, Steven Davis (of University of California Irvine), and Nathan Lewis (of Caltech).

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Outbursts from Supermassive Black Hole at Milky Way Center Forming Super Earths

 
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A team of astrophysicists and planetary scientists has predicted that Neptune-like planets located near the center of the Milky Way galaxy have been transformed into rocky planets by outbursts generated by the nearby supermassive black hole.

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The Ultimate Alien Star System --"416 Planets in the Habitable Zone"

 

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We astronomers are happy to have measured that up to half of the stars in the Milky Way appear to host Earth-sized planets in the habitable zone (NEarth is up to 50 percent for red dwarfs, the dominant stars in the galaxy by number). TRAPPIST-1 is a great example that goes even further and packs three planets in the habitable zone. But I’m hoping for some super-habitable systems with 10, 20, or hundreds of potentially life-bearing planets. They are sure to be low probability systems, but with five hundred billion stars in our galaxy (and sci-fi fans crossing their fingers) it’s definitely worth looking!

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Milky Way's Amazing Galactic Plane in 4 Wavelengths (WATCH Video)

 

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Pointing Chile’s APEX telescope toward the southern hemisphere’s night sky, researchers mapped the Milky Way’s “Galactic Plane” in a sweep of our galaxy four times the size of previous maps, covering an area 140 degrees long and 3 degrees wide.

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"Life on Enceladus" --Researchers Have Spent the Last 5 years Recreating Conditions of Its Ocean (Today's Top Space Headline)

 

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Researchers at the University of Vienna have spent the last five years recreating the predicted conditions of Enceladus’s subsurface ocean in the lab. They designed experiments with temperatures, pressures, pH levels, and salinity similar to that of the Enceladian ocean. Into these environments they placed three strains of single-celled microorganisms called methanogenic archaea—bacteria that hate oxygen, love carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and produce methane as waste. Then the researchers watched the strains grow.

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Today's "Planet Earth Report" -- Anniversary of Operation Gunnerside: 'The Attack on Heavy Water That Deprived the Nazis of the Atomic Bomb'

 

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Feb. 28 marks the 75th anniversary of Operation Gunnerside, and though it hasn’t yet been 100 years, the memory of this successful Norwegian mission remains strong both within Norway and beyond. Memorialized in movies, books and TV mini-series, the winter sabotage of the Vemork chemical plant in Telemark County of Nazi-occupied Norway was one of the most dramatic and important military missions of World War II. It put the German nuclear scientists months behind and allowed the United States to overtake the Germans in the quest to produce the first atomic bomb.

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Moon Water Raises Questions About the Giant-Impact-Origin Theory

 
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It's amazing what a difference a little water can make. The Moon formed between about 4.4 and 4.5 billion years ago when an object collided with the still-forming proto-Earth. This impact created a hot and partially vaporized disk of material that rotated around the baby planet, eventually cooling and accreting into the Moon.

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