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"Faster Than the Speed of Light?" --(VIEW Today's "Galaxy" Stream)

 

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“The idea that the speed of light could be variable was radical when first proposed, but with a numerical prediction, it becomes something physicists can actually test," said professor João Magueijo at the Imperial College London. "If true, it would mean that the laws of nature were not always the same as they are today.”

In 2011,  CERN's OPERA team had timed neutrinos fired through Earth from the European particle physics laboratory, CERN, near Geneva, Switzerland, and found that they made the 730-kilometer trip to Gran Sasso 60 nanosecond faster than they would traveling at light speed. Subsequently, five different teams of physicists independently verified that elusive subatomic particles called neutrinos do not travel faster than light.



This past November, 2016 scientists behind a theory that concludes that the speed of light is variable - and not constant as Einstein suggested - have made a prediction that could be tested. Einstein observed that the speed of light remains the same in any situation, and this meant that space and time could be different in different situations.

The assumption that the speed of light is constant, and always has been, underpins many theories in physics, such as Einstein’s theory of general relativity. In particular, it plays a role in models of what happened in the very early universe, seconds after the Big Bang.

 

 

The idea that the speed of light could be variable was radical when first proposed, but with a numerical prediction, it becomes something physicists can actually test. If true, it would mean that the laws of nature were not always the same as they are today.

But some researchers have suggested that the speed of light could have been much higher in this early universe. Now, one of this theory’s originators, Magueijo from Imperial College London, working with Dr Niayesh Afshordi at the Perimeter Institute in Canada, has made a prediction that could be used to test the theory’s validity.

Structures in the universe, for example galaxies, all formed from fluctuations in the early universe – tiny differences in density from one region to another. A record of these early fluctuations is imprinted on the cosmic microwave background – a map of the oldest light in the universe – in the form of a ‘spectral index’.

Working with their theory that the fluctuations were influenced by a varying speed of light in the early universe, Professor Magueijo and Dr Afshordi have now used a model to put an exact figure on the spectral index. The predicted figure and the model it is based on are published in the journal Physical Review D.

Cosmologists are currently getting ever more precise readings of this figure, so that prediction could soon be tested – either confirming or ruling out the team’s model of the early universe. Their figure is a very precise 0.96478. This is close to the current estimate of readings of the cosmic microwave background, which puts it around 0.968, with some margin of error.

Professor Magueijo said: “The theory, which we first proposed in the late-1990s, has now reached a maturity point – it has produced a testable prediction. If observations in the near future do find this number to be accurate, it could lead to a modification of Einstein’s theory of gravity.

The testability of the varying speed of light theory sets it apart from the more mainstream rival theory: inflation. Inflation says that the early universe went through an extremely rapid expansion phase, much faster than the current rate of expansion of the universe.

These theories are necessary to overcome what physicists call the ‘horizon problem’. The universe as we see it today appears to be everywhere broadly the same, for example it has a relatively homogenous density.

This could only be true if all regions of the universe were able to influence each other. However, if the speed of light has always been the same, then not enough time has passed for light to have travelled to the edge of the universe, and ‘even out’ the energy.

As an analogy, to heat up a room evenly, the warm air from radiators at either end has to travel across the room and mix fully. The problem for the universe is that the ‘room’ – the observed size of the universe – appears to be too large for this to have happened in the time since it was formed.

 

 

The varying speed of light theory suggests that the speed of light was much higher in the early universe, allowing the distant edges to be connected as the universe expanded. The speed of light would have then dropped in a predictable way as the density of the universe changed. This variability led the team to the prediction published today.

The alternative theory is inflation, which attempts to solve this problem by saying that the very early universe evened out while incredibly small, and then suddenly expanded, with the uniformity already imprinted on it. While this means the speed of light and the other laws of physics as we know them are preserved, it requires the invention of an ‘inflaton field’ – a set of conditions that only existed at the time.

Flash back to 2012, the CERN's OPERA team had timed neutrinos fired through Earth from the European particle physics laboratory, CERN, near Geneva, Switzerland, and found that they made the 730-kilometer trip to Gran Sasso 60 nanosecond faster than they would traveling at light speed.

Subsequently, five different teams of physicists independently verified that elusive subatomic particles called neutrinos do not travel faster than light. New results contradict those announced in September 2012 by a 170-member crew working with the OPERA particle detector in Italy's subterranean Gran Sasso National Laboratory. The OPERA team made headlines after they suggested neutrinos traveled 0.002% faster than light, thus violating Einstein's theory of special relativity. The OPERA results were debunked months ago, however. So instead of the nail in the coffin of faster-than-light neutrinos, the new suite of results is more like the sod planted atop their grave.

The OPERA team had timed neutrinos fired through Earth from the European particle physics laboratory, CERN, near Geneva, Switzerland, and found that they made the 730-kilometer trip to Gran Sasso 60 nanosecond faster than they would traveling at light speed.

But in February, the OPERA team also discovered that a loose fiber optic cable had introduced a delay in their timing system that explained the effect. A month later, researchers working with the ICARUS particle detector, also housed in Gran Sasso, measured the speed of neutrinos fired from CERN and found that they travel at light speed, as predicted. By that point, most physicists deemed faster-than-light neutrinos really most sincerely dead. Some OPERA team members thought the whole episode had besmirched the collaboration's reputation, and in March, two of the team's elected leaders lost a vote of no confidence and tendered their resignations.

Nevertheless, researchers kept at their efforts to test the result. Gran Sasso houses four particle detectors capable of timing neutrinos fired from CERN: OPERA, ICARUS, BOREXINO, and LVD. All four found that the neutrino's speed is consistent with the speed of light, as Sergio Bertolucci, research director at CERN, reported at the 25th International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics in Kyoto, Japan.

The speed of neutrinos was also measured by researchers working with the MINOS experiment, which shoots neutrinos 735 kilometers from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois, to a detector in the Soudan mine in northern Minnesota. The MINOS team has also found that neutrinos travel at light speed, as Fermilab's Phil Adamson reported at the meeting.

So the chorus has sung and the final curtain has fallen on the faster-than-light neutrino saga. "The story captured the public imagination, and has given people the opportunity to see the scientific method in action—an unexpected result was put up for scrutiny, thoroughly investigated and resolved in part thanks to collaboration between normally competing experiments," Bertolucci says in a CERN press release. "That's how science moves forward."

The Daily Galaxy via Imperial College of London and sciencemag.org

Image credit: Top of page, black hole jet ESA XMM Newton

 

Comments

Well If you think about it, there was no speed of light limits when there was no light in the universe, when the temperatures were too hot for anything .

My guess is that light travels at the speed it does because it is somehow prevented from going even faster by something going on in the fabric of the universe itself that we do not yet fully understand. The speed of light, and of massless neutrinos, is probably actually near infinite otherwise. It's not how fast light goes, it's what is slowing it down.

I once read a monograph by astronomer T.J.J. See out of San Francisco which used a sort of 'tension' in spacetime to derive the speed of light. I don't recall if the tension was time-varying, though. Perhaps he was on to something.

Einstein was right or not... the whole time the same nonsense. Was he right or not? He was wrong, many times even in fundamendal things like movement of Galaxies. He was good at that time of civilization, but it is 100 years later!

It is true that you can not travel faster than light but it is possible to influence other parts of that equation to achieve faster than light travel without breaking the speed limit. Given what we know about the density of matter and how it reacts on space at a quantum level, this gives us the answer to the problem. The solution to travelling at the speed of light (not to mention the indestructible material needed for such venture) lies in particle matter. Quarks have the strongest bonds in the universe, when two strange quarks come together there is no breaking of that bond. If we could smash atoms and manipulate these quarks and "print" sheets less than an atom thick of quark matter, this would give us the material that we need. At a quantum level this material would pull space to its limit just as a quark star does, and just as this type of star would "collapse" itself into a 'black hole" if energy is added "matter", this material would would do the same at a quantum level when given energy "speed". You would be manipulating the distance part of the equation by creating a sort of slip stream when energy is applied to a material that is already pulling space at its tightest limit at the quantum level. This material would also be indestructible by nature, the only way to destroy quark matter is to drive it into absolute matter/energy through the means of a black hole. I would imagine this material would look like sheets of foil that would feel almost liquid to the touch that you could not stretch it or rip it. Under the most powerful microscope it would still appear perfectly flat, giving off no answers to the science community only questions. You could give it to a species without the fear of advancing its technology, it would only spur questions in which they would have to find their own answers (enlightenment). Sounds familiar does it not?

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