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NASA's Pluto Discovery: Charon's Strange Mountain --"Has Geologists Stunned and Stumped"

 

 

Mysteriousmo

 


This new image of an area on Pluto's largest moon Charon has a captivating feature—a depression with a peak in the middle, shown here in the upper left corner of the inset, covering an area approximately 240 miles (390 kilometers) from top to bottom, including few visible craters. “The most intriguing feature is a large mountain sitting in a moat,” said Jeff Moore with NASA’s Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, who leads New Horizons’ Geology, Geophysics and Imaging team. “This is a feature that has geologists stunned and stumped.”

This image gives a preview of what the surface of this large moon will look like in future close-ups from NASA's New Horizons spacecraft. This image is heavily compressed; sharper versions are anticipated when the full-fidelity data from New Horizons' Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) are returned to Earth.

The rectangle superimposed on the global view of Charon shows the approximate location of this close-up view.

The image was taken at approximately 6:30 a.m. EDT (10:30 UTC) on July 14, 2015, about 1.5 hours before closest approach to Pluto, from a range of 49,000 miles (79,000 kilometers).

Image Credit: NASA-JHUAPL-SwRI

Comments

Impact of something stronger than the maternal of Charon that survived impact

Why not some explanation as simple as a rather large, long, Ni-Fe asteroid striking Charon slowly enough to bury itself hip deep in the surface leaving a couple of thousand feet of tail showing above the crater it dug on the way in. Though traveling slowly enough with enough "toughness" (hence Ni-Fe) not to blast itself to pieces and powder across hell's half acre. ??

It looks like the back end of an "ice splinter," an icicle like shape, that crashed into the surface, depressing the surrounding surface, leaving only its back end exposed. Perhaps it was a piece of icy/rocky debris from the ancient collision of Charon and Pluto.

the problem is that splinter seems to have around 10 Km (6 miles)...hard to keep something that big intact. And i`m talking only about the part that is visible outside, not including the rest of it under the surface.

Notice that more and more rational explanations for observable space phenomena suffer bafflement, stumping, puzzlement and stunningness?

Sure, it's a mysterious universe, but when it comes to interpretation of what's actually there, as opposed to explanatory convenience by cool manipulation of virtual stand-ins generated by JPL computer artists, ..stumpedness decidedly prevails.

So, why when we encounter the actual physical specimens of comets, moons, dwarf planets and their giant counterparts, do we get dizzy speculating about what we're seeing?

Maybe it's a sign of model failure. Maybe we're under the spell of bad science that force feeds mistakes of the past polluting our ability to understand what we're seeing. Maybe we have something fundamentally wrong.

Maybe Halton Arp, Tesla and others, shouldn't have unjustly been shuffled off to obscurity by powerful interests only financially linked to the institutional administration and funding of science.

Maybe we need a hard look at plasma physics and the universal force of electricity.

whatever you`re smoking there...change your dealer ...

That's nice, G.

Can't say something intelligent, ..so say something nasty, eh?

Ad hominem: sure sign of a weak mind.

OK...keep your dealer if you`re so fond of him...i prefer to keep my weak mind clear :) wishing you the best recovery :)

If the depression is an impact crater, then possibly the uplift of the mountain occurred after the impact. If the moon has tectonic activity, the impact could have disrupted an active fault line resulting in subsequent uplift. Also the linear features to the left of the inset appear to be mountain ranges, suggesting some type of tectonic history on Charon.

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