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Atacama Desert's "Extreme Microbial Oasis" --A Preview of Future Mars Discoveries?


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Mars may have been arid for more than 600 million years, making it too hostile for any life to survive on the planet’s surface, according to researchers who have been carrying out the painstaking task of analysing individual particles of Martian soil collected during the 2008 NASA Phoenix mission. The team estimated that the soil on Mars had been exposed to liquid water --critical for life--for at most 5,000 years since its formation billions of years ago.

At present Mars is tilted on its axis at about the same angle as Earth’s. Five million years ago, however, Mars leaned over at an angle of about 45º, and for nearly half of each martian year (equivalent to about one Earth year), the polar regions received constant sunlight. Back then “the ground ice at the polar regions,” like the site where NASA’s Phoenix spacecraft landed in 2008, “would have been much warmer. We think it would have been in the range of -15ºC to -20ºC. So liquid water layers” in the past were “a possibility.”


The question then is this: If life ever took hold on Mars, back when the planet was warmer and wetter, did a few hardy microbes evolve a survival strategy that let them go into a deep sleep, and then every 10 or 20 million years, when the ground warmed up to -20ºC or so, wake up and put on a little growth spurt?

Future NASA and ESA missions that are planned for Mars will have to dig deeper to search for evidence of life, which may still be taking refuge underground.”

An Earth-based preview of what future Mars' missions may discover has been discovered two meters below the surface of Chile's Atacama Desert there where an 'oasis' of bacteria and archaea (primitive microorganisms)  were found by researchers from the Center of Astrobiology (Spain) and the Catholic University of the North in Chile.  

The microorganisms were found thriving in hypersaline substrates by SOLID, a detector for signs of life which could be used in environments similar to subsoil on Mars (Image below, El Tatio Geysers, Atacama Desert).

 

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"We have named it a 'microbial oasis' because we found microorganisms developing in a habitat that was rich in halite (rock salt) and other highly hygroscopic compounds (anhydrite and perchlorate) that absorb water" explained Victor Parro, researcher from the Center of Astrobiology (INTA-CSIC, Spain) and coordinator of the study.

Furthermore, the substrates where the microbes live favour deliquescence, which means they can attract the limited moisture in the air, condensing it on the surface of the salt crystals. Thin films of water that are a few microns thick are thereby formed.

In this environment, the underground microorganisms grow with everything they need to live: food and water. The species are not very different from others in similar hypersaline environments, but the peculiar thing is that they were discovered at a depth of between 2 and 3 metres, without any oxygen or sunlight.

The core of SOLID is a biochip –called LDChip– which includes up to 450 antibodies to identify biological material, such as sugar, DNA and protein. Samples can be taken, incubated and processed automatically and the results can be observed in an image with shiny points that show the presence of certain compounds and microorganisms.

Using this technique, the researchers in collaboration with Catholic University of the North in Chile have confirmed the presence of underground archaea and bacteria in the desert. They also took samples from a depth of up to 5 metres and took them to the laboratory, where not only were they able to photograph the microorganisms with the electron microscope, but also 'brought them into life' when supplied with water.

"If there are similar microbes on Mars or remains in similar conditions to the ones we have found in Atacama, we could detect them with instruments like SOLID" Parro added.

The researcher explained that saline deposits have been found on the red planet, therefore it is possible to think that there maybe hypersaline environments in its subsoil. "The high concentration of salt has a double effect: it absorbs water between the crystals and lowers the freezing point, so that they can have thin films of water (in brine) at temperatures several degrees below zero, up to minus 20 C."

The high salt level and lack of water help preserve biological molecules, so that it was possible to find biological products in materials of this type, even though there were no live microorganisms since millions of years ago.

More information: Parro et al. "A microbial oasis in the hypersaline Atacama subsurface discovered by a life detector chip: implications for the search for life on Mars". Astrobiology 11(10): 969-96, December 2011. Doi: 10.1089/ast.2011.0654

 

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The Daily Galaxy via FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology

Comments

"...temperatures several degrees below zero, up to minus 20 C."
I'm confused as to what this means. By "up to", does he mean "as low as"?

forget about any discoveries. no budget. banks get the money / donate same money to campaigns / bail out bank crimes. laugh at 99%

no science for the USA. they would fck it up anyway

Gerry,
Why not go to a polital forum, and talk about that stuff?

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