"Deadly Dwarfs" --Could They be the Cause of the 'Great Silence'?
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August 16, 2011

"Deadly Dwarfs" --Could They be the Cause of the 'Great Silence'?

  6a00d8341bf7f753ef014e87efcd11970d-800wi

The physicist Enrico Fermi once asked referring to visits to Earth by extraterrestrial civilizations: Where are they? The accurate answer might well be: destroyed by radiation from supernova explosions. Most astronomers today believe that one of the plausible reasons we have yet to detect intelligent life in the universe is due to the deadly effects of local supernova explosions that wipe out all life in a given region of a galaxy.

Results have shows that the Chandra image of M31-the Andromeda galaxy implies that the merger of two white dwarfs is the main trigger for Type Ia supernovas. The object would be about 40 times brighter than observed if the type Ia supernova in the bulge of the galaxy were triggered by material from a normal star falling onto a white dwarf star. Similar results for five elliptical galaxies were found.

These findings represent a major advance in understanding the origin of Type Ia supernovas, explosions that are used as cosmic mile markers to measure the accelerated expansion of the universe and study dark energy.

Most scientists agree that a Type Ia supernova occurs when a white dwarf star -- a collapsed remnant of an elderly star -- exceeds its weight limit, becomes unstable and explodes. However, there is uncertainty about what pushes the white dwarf over the edge, either accretion onto the white dwarf or a merger between two white dwarfs.

A massive white dwarf star in our galaxy may become a supernova several million years from now, and could possibly destroy life on Earth.

While there is, on average, only one supernova per galaxy per century, there is something on the order of 100 billion galaxies in the observable Universe. Taking 10 billion years for the age of the Universe (it's actually 13.7 billion, but stars didn't form for the first few hundred million), Dr. Richard Mushotzky of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, derived a figure of 1 billion supernovae per year, or 30 supernovae per second in the observable Universe.

Certain rare stars -real killers -type 11 stars, are core-collapse hypernova that generate deadly gamma ray bursts (GRBs). These long burst objects release 1000 times the non-neutrino energy release of an ordinary "core-collapse" supernova. Concrete proof of the core-collapse GRB model came in 2003.

It was made possible in part to a fortuitously "nearby" burst whose location was distributed to astronomers by the Gamma-ray Burst Coordinates Network (GCN). On March 29, 2003, a burst went off close enough that the follow-up observations were decisive in solving the gamma-ray burst mystery. The optical spectrum of the afterglow was nearly identical to that of supernova SN1998bw. In addition, observations from x-ray satellites showed the same characteristic signature of "shocked" and "heated" oxygen that's also present in supernovae. Thus, astronomers were able to determine the "afterglow" light of a relatively close gamma-ray burst (located "just" 2 billion light years away) resembled a supernova.

It isn't known if every hypernova is associated with a GRB. However, astronomers estimate only about one out of 100,000 supernovae produce a hypernova. This works out to about one gamma-ray burst per day, which is in fact what is observed.

What is almost certain is that the core of the star involved in a given hypernova is massive enough to collapse into a black hole (rather than a neutron star). So every GRB detected is also the "birth cry" of a new black hole.

6a00d8341bf7f753ef012876b6593e970c-320wi New observations of T Pyxidis in the constellation Pyxis (the compass) using the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite, indicate the white dwarf is part of a close binary system with a sun, and the pair are 3,260 light-years from Earth and much closer than the previous estimate of 6,000 light-years.

The white dwarf in the T Pyxidis system is a recurrent nova, which means it undergoes nova (thermonuclear) eruptions around every 20 years. The most recent known events were in 1967, 1944, 1920, 1902, and 1890. These explosions are nova rather than supernova events, and do not destroy the star, and have no effect on Earth. The astronomers do not know why the there has been a longer than usual interval since the last nova eruption.

Astronomers believe the nova explosions are the result of an increase of mass as the dwarf siphons off hydrogen-rich gases from its stellar companion. When the mass reaches a certain limit a nova is triggered. It is unknown whether there is a net gain or loss of mass during the siphoning/explosion cycle, but if the mass does build up the so-called Chandrasekhar Limit could be reached, and the dwarf would then become a Type 1a supernova. In this event the dwarf would collapse and detonate a massive explosion resulting in its total destruction. This type of supernova releases 10 million times the energy of a nova.

Observations of the white dwarf during the nova eruptions suggest its mass is increasing, and pictures from the Hubble telescope of shells of material expelled during the previous explosions support the view. Models estimate the white dwarf's mass could reach the Chandrasekhar Limit in around 10 million years or less.

According to the scientists the supernova would result in gamma radiation with an energy equivalent to 1,000 solar flares simultaneously - enough to threaten Earth by production of nitrous oxides that would damage and perhaps destroy the ozone layer. The supernova would be as bright as all the other stars in the Milky Way put together. One of the astronomers, Dr Edward Sion, from Villanova University in Pennsylvania, said the supernova could occur "soon" on the timescales familiar to astronomers and geologists, but this is a long time in the future in human terms.

Astronomers think supernova explosions closer than 100 light years from Earth would be catastrophic, but the effects of events further away are unclear and would depend on how powerful the supernova is. The research team postulate it could be close enough and powerful enough to damage Earth, possibly severely, although other researchers, such as Professor Fillipenko of the Berkeley Astronomy Department, disagree with the calculations and believe the supernova, if it occurred, would be unlikely to damage the planet.

6a00d8341bf7f753ef012876b885fa970c-320wi The image left is a composite Chandra X-ray (blue) and Palomar infrared (red and green) image of the supernova remnant W49B -a barrel-shaped nebula consisting of bright infrared rings around a glowing bar of intense X-radiation along the axis. W49B was created when a massive star formed from a dense cloud of dust and gas, shone brightly for a few million years while spinning off rings of gas and pushing them away to form a nearly empty cavity around the star. The star then exhausted its nuclear fuel and its core collapsed to form a black hole. Much of the gas around the black hole was pulled into it, but some, including material rich in iron and nickel was flung away in oppositely directed jets of gas traveling near the speed of light. When the jet hit the dense cloud surrounding the star, it flared out and drove a shock wave into the cloud.

An observer aligned with one these jets would have seen a gamma-ray burst, a blinding flash in which the concentrated power equals that of ten quadrillion Suns for a minute or so. The view perpendicular to the jets would be a less astonishing, although nonetheless spectacular supernova explosion. For W49B, the jet is tilted out of the plane of the sky by about 20 degrees, but the remains of the jet are visible as a hot X-ray emitting bar of gas.

W49B is about 35 thousand light years away, whereas the nearest known gamma-ray burst to Earth is several million light years away - most are billions of light years distant. And safe to Earthlings.


Casey Kazan via NASAJPL and Chandra Space Telescope/Harvard

http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2010/type1a/
http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/science/know_l1/why_hyper.html

Comments

I don't think an advanced civilization would be doing interstellar communication using radio waves. I really think the signals would not be detected when traveling light years,they are to weak. So we probably don't have the equipment to detect what they may be using. If they are still using radio waves they probably are about as advanced as we are and getting no replys either.

So the Universe sterilizes itself somewhere every second. A supernova essentially wipes out all live for 100 lightyears around it. And since there's a supernova in every galaxy, sooner or later, that pretty much keeps the place from being all crapped up with supposedly intelligent slime mold and such.

Good idea, god. Keeps you from being overrun with competitors.

Supernovas also happen when I slam asteroids into Mass Relays, or destroy Collector Bases. Just saying.

I agree, Paul - being able to travel faster than light but then use a communication method that travels only at the speed of light seems frivolous. And if FTL travel is impossible then Fermi's idea is no paradox, for the vast amounts of space and "time" would make neighbourly contact immensely sparse.

My main contentions with Fermi's so-called "paradox" are on two fronts.

One, he's assuming we haven't made contact. I can't say we absolutely have, but the data and theories in that possible direction seem far more data-orientated than the paradigm paralyzed naysayers of "absolutely no way have we yet been contacted throughout human existence".

Two, he assumes humans are intelligent beings - we are not, certainly not as a whole, and I argue not even so on the individual level...not yet. We are capable of moving in that direction but what I see all around me is not what I would consider intelligence - not the level of knowledge that would be required to travel the vastness of space in feasible times and be able to survive not just the incredible hostilities of the universe on a metascale, but overcome the hostilities inherent on the microscale, or at least so our own progress would suggest to be somewhere between possible and almost guaranteed to plague other life forms during their evolution. Society’s plague of problems are an effect of our intellectual shortcomings and only upon our ability to truly conquer our individual failures will society be able to become a true interstellar factor of intelligence.

That is of course absent the exception to the rule. Were we to become technologically advanced absent obtaining an intellectual evolutionary leap we could well become galactically significant, but on terms similar to that of a deadly viral outbreak.


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