Giant Virus-Eating Virus Discovered in Antarctica Lake
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March 31, 2011

Giant Virus-Eating Virus Discovered in Antarctica Lake

 Field_camp_lake_ellsworth

A virus, dubbed "Organic Lake Virophage" or OLV, was discovered in Organic Lake, a 6,000-year-old body of saltwater in eastern Antarctica. Researchers found its genome hidden in sequences of local Phycodnaviruses -- giant viruses that basically live in the lake and attack algae. Evidence suggests these two viruses have been swapping genes and co-evolving. Scientists have concluded that the OLV depends on the Phycodnaviruses for survival. The scientists also believe there may be other virus-eating viruses lurking in the depths.

The OLV actually support the ecosystem by making sure there's enough algae for other bacteria to eat. In 2008, the first virophage, Sputnick, was discovered. Scientists who have been looking for another large-scale discovery to confirm their findings, have found it. The discovery hold the clue  to understanding and defeating the viruses that attack our own immune systems.

The Daily Galaxy via nature.com

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Comments

I'm wondering if such a virus would eat HIV or rhinovirus. We might have finally found a cure for the common cold!

Introducing new live virus strains to eat other viruses sounds a lot like introducing grass carp into an ecosystem to eat the algae. The effort turned out well, NOT.

Isn't the definition of a virus that it is a dead, not living thing? I am confused as to how it 'eats' other virus' or how it does so in order to 'survive'. Any help here?

Isn't the definition of a virus that it is a dead, not living thing? I am confused as to how it 'eats' other virus' or how it does so in order to 'survive'. Any help here?

Oh wow, very interesting. This is a very cool discovery!

privacy-resources.ie.tc

Very interesting stuff. This article just had one of those titles that I just had to read. I was like "Virus eating a virus"?? HUH?

virus' are not dead, immunisation (injection most children receive) are dead virus cells that the body can break down and learn about

A virus is non-life in the sense that it is unable to reprodce on its own. Biology has a definition of what is living and it excludes viruses. They are just protein and RNA. Im guessing 'eat' is very loosely used here. It probably just absorbes it in some way and breaks it down

Viruses can be dormant for a long time, much like undamaged seeds. They likely are in outer space nebulae clouds where organic compounds have been discovered, according to Hoyle and Ramashee. Then them "come to life" when conditions are suitable. Besides viruses, Hoyle believed that nebulaes contain algae and mostly dead bacteria. If so, the universe is grossly parasitic, and quite frankly then, I hope this universe is not the "only one", because from this viewpoint, the earth is parasitic too, and not doing any better then the clouds.
http://holographicgalaxy.blogspot.com

Heh-heh. Yeah, let another virus go rummaging through our body eating other viruses. What could go wrong there?

My understanding is that the virus eating virus works like this:

A normal virus breaks into a cell, and uses the host cell's machinery to make a bunch of copies of itself, which then emerge from the cell (often killing it). The virophage probably injects itself into a cell which is infected by a virus, and interferes with the original virus, co-opting it's infection to make more virophage instead of more original virus.

Sounds like an April fool story to me!!

I echo the questions of previous commenters: how does a virus, a nonliving bundle of proteins and nucleic acids, "eat" something. To actually do something, the virus must infect something living such as a bacterium.

This article doesn't provide any references or external links to back any of the claims. Unless references are provided, I am disinclined to believe any of this. Please keep this in mind when writing future articles.

Um... yes, virophages exist. Anyone with minimal knowledge of microbiology should at least be aware of them. The news piece itself is legit as well -- see the Nature article at http://www.nature.com/news/2011/110328/full/news.2011.188.html

She swallowed the horse (she died, of course) to catch the dog. She swallowed the dog (what a hog) to catch the cat. She swallowed the cat (imagine that) to catch the bird. She swallowed the bird (how absurd) to catch the spider. She swallowed the spider to catch the giant virus eating virus. She swallowed the giant virus eating virus to catch the virus. She caught the virus by .... oh nevermind.

Viruses are essentially balls of rna that attach to other organisms and insert RNA that alters the biological processes to produce more of the virus.

Since a virus has no active processes to alter, a Virophage binds to a "host" virus and inserts RNA that alters the hosts payload so that when it, in turn. binds to an organism, the phage virus is produced instead of ( or potentially in addition to ) the "host" virus.

Put more simply Virus A infects Virus B. Virus B infects algae. Algae begins to produce virus A instead of virus B.

APRIL FOOLS!

Viruses are not necessarily just RNA, their genetic information can also be DNA too.

Yes, viruses are not alive. But the fact that they exist, i.e. genetic material inside of a protein shell for the most part, makes scientist call it "alive." If said virus were to be completely obliterated, in that ALL protein coated genetic material specific to a particular virus just disappeared, then one would say that the virus died. The viruses are said to be alive in that they have the capacity to perpetuate themselves. They don't do this cognizantly or intentionally, but rather by random molecular and biological interactions with cells (and now viruses) in their environment.

the scientists who have been looking for another large-scale discovery to confirm their findings, have found it.

Ok, by my limited understanding of viruses. The viruses bond to specific types of receptors on cells, inject their RNA or whatnot and cause the cells to make more viruses that then escape, and the process repeates. So if the virus needs to infect infected cells of another type of virus in order to duplicate itself, shouldnt we be fine because the viruses wont attack us? Unless of course it infects our cells by itself.

When this 'virus-eating-virus' is done with d virus, does it not going to have any effect on the body in which it acts?

When this 'virus-eating-virus' is done with d virus, does it not going to have any effect on the body in which it acts?

did anyone play resident evil??????

When this 'virus-eating-virus' is done with d virus, does it not going to have any effect on the body in which it acts?

Bullshit and nosense! HIV itself was introduced to us humans by those so-called scientist in quest to conquer minor diseases (Well, minor compared to AIDS). Who knows what damage with the "virus-eating virus" will bring?


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