Einstein's Cross -A Quasar at the Edge of the Observable Universe
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June 28, 2010

Einstein's Cross -A Quasar at the Edge of the Observable Universe


CrossThe Einstein Cross is a gravitationally lensed quasar that is quadruply imaged, hence its name, Einstein Cross, forming a nearly perfect cross, with the lensing galaxy at its center. The quasar is located about 8 billion light years from Earth, while the lensing galaxy is located at a distance of 400 million light years. Many scientists believe quasars are powered by giant black holes feeding on nearby gas. Gas trapped in the black hole's powerful gravity is compressed and heated to millions of degrees, giving off intense light and/or radio energy. Most quasars lurk in the outer reaches of the cosmos, over a billion light years away, and are therefore distant enough to appear stationary to us.

The supermassive black holes created early in the history of the universe may have gone on to produce the phenomenon of quasars such as the Einstein Cross -the very bright, energetic centers of distant galaxies that can be a trillion times brighter than our sun. 

Big black holes formed via supermassive stars could have had a huge impact on the evolution of the universe, including galaxy formation," says. Mitchell Begelman, a professor and the chair of University of Colorado-Boulder's astrophysical and planetary sciences.

The predecessors to black hole formation, objects called supermassive stars, probably started forming within the first few hundred million years after the Big Bang some 14 billion years ago. A supermassive star eventually would have grown to a huge size -- as much as tens of millions of times the mass of our sun -- and would have been short-lived, with its core collapsing in just in few million years.

Begelman calculated how supermassive stars might have formed, as well as the masses of their cores. These calculations allowed him to estimate their subsequent size and evolution, including how they ultimately left behind "seed" black holes.

Begelman said the hydrogen-burning supermassive stars would had to have been stabilized by their own rotation or some other form of energy like magnetic fields or turbulence in order to facilitate the speedy growth of black holes at their centers. "What's new here is we think we have found a new mechanism to form these giant supermassive stars, which gives us a new way of understanding how big black holes may have formed relatively fast," said Begelman.

Because of the tremendous amount of matter consumed by supermassive stars, subsequent seed black holes that formed in their centers may have started out much bigger than ordinary black holes -- which are the mass of only a few Earth suns -- and subsequently grew much faster.

After the seed black holes formed, the process entered its second stage, which Begelman has dubbed the "quasistar" stage. In this phase, black holes grew rapidly by swallowing matter from the bloated envelope of gas surrounding them, which eventually inflated to a size as large as Earth's solar system and cooled at the same time, he said.

Once quasistars cooled past a certain point, radiation began escaping at such a high rate that it caused the gas envelope to disperse and left behind black holes up to 10,000 times or more the mass of Earth's sun, Begelman said. With such a big head start over ordinary black holes, they could have grown into supermassive black holes millions or billions of times the mass of the sun either by gobbling up gas from surrounding galaxies or merging with other black holes in extremely violent galactic collisions.

"Until recently, the thinking by many has been that supermassive black holes got their start from the merging of numerous, small black holes in the universe," he said. "This new model of black hole development indicates a possible alternate route to their formation."

The supermassive black holes created early in the history of the universe may have gone on to produce the phenomenon of quasars -- the very bright, energetic centers of distant galaxies that can be a trillion times brighter than our sun. There also is evidence that a supermassive black hole inhabits the center of every massive galaxy today, including our own Milky Way, said Begelman.

Casey Kazan

Source: University of Colorado

 

Comments

It makes sense that black holes will consume the nearby gas and eventally emit enough radiation to push out against anything near it. Then the black hole enters a "dark stage" where surrounding gases are not illuminated by superheated consumption. Sort of like my diet after the holidays.

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BEFORE THE BIG BANG,THE UNIVERSE WAS A DENSE BALL OF ENERGY THE SIZE OF A PINHEAD.AFTER THE BIG BANG THE ENERGY THAT WAS RELEASED SPREAD CREATING THE FABRIC OF SPACE AND TIME.THIS FABRIC CONTAINED THE ENERGY IN FORM OF STRINGS[string theory].THE STRINGS ARE UNIMAGINABLY SMALL AND HENCE SPACE WAS FIRST THOUGHT TO BE A VACUUM BUT ACTUALLY THE FABRIC OF SPACE IS WOVEN BY THE STRINGS.GRAVITY PLAYED A ROLE AND SOME STRINGS FORMED CLUSTERS AND THE FIRST SUBATOMIC PARTICLE WAS BORN.


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