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Will the Internet Evolve into a Lifeform? -A Galaxy Insight

Lifeform Some think that sentience could emerge from any sufficiently complicated system.  By the way, you're reading this on a massively-crosslinked network built from millions of routers, allowing any of a billion individual units to access, modify and reply to the others.  Interested?

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Your "Digital Shadow" -a Mind-Bending Prediction

Philip "We discovered that only about half of your digital footprint is related to your individual actions—taking pictures, sending e-mails, or making digital voice calls. The other half is what we call the 'digital shadow'—information about you—names in financial records, names on mailing lists, web surfing histories or images taken of you by security cameras in airports or urban centers. For the first time your digital shadow is larger than the digital information you actively create about yourself."

IDC senior vice president, John Gantz

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Pattern Recognition: Quest for Identity in the Digital Village

Shutterstock_2744622_1We've listened to lots of great discussions at conferences and universities. This timeless, 1968 discussion between Pulitzer Prize winner, Norman Mailer and Marshall McLuhan, which we discovered last month, is one of the all-time greats. What triggered the idea to post this was the publication of Mailer's new novel The Castle in the Forest about Adolph Hitler's youth (see the Charlie Rose Interview with Mailer about the book).

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Beatles "A Hard Day's Night" Chord Mystery Solved Using Fourier Transform

Beatles_2 It’s the most famous chord in rock 'n' roll, an instantly recognizable twang rolling through the open strings on George Harrison’s 12-string Rickenbacker. It evokes a Pavlovian response from music fans as they sing along to the refrain that follows:

    "It’s been a hard day’s night
    And I’ve been working like a dog"

The opening chord to "A Hard Day’s Night" is also famous because, for 40 years, no one quite knew exactly what chord Harrison was playing.

There were theories aplenty and musicians, scholars and amateur guitar players all gave it a try, but it took a Dalhousie mathematician to figure out the exact formula.

Recommended by Billy Jones.

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The Search for an Ancient Supernova in the Antarctica

Antarctica Japanese scientists journeyed to Antarctica to recover evidence of alterations to Earth's atmosphere caused in medieval times by supernovae recorded by scholars - including obscure Irish monasteries where monks later interpreted them signs of the Antichrist . No, this isn't the plot of the next Dan Brown novel (or a Dan Brow fanfiction written by an X-Files addict): this is real science.

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