"So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish!" -A Saturn Moon Teaming with Organic Chemicals: A Galaxy Insight
Follow the Daily Galaxy
Add Daily Galaxy to igoogle page AddThis Feed Button Join The Daily Galaxy Group on Facebook Follow The Daily Galaxy Group on twitter
 

« The End of Aging? Experts Point to Unknown Dangers: A Galaxy Classic | Main | Antarctica 207 B.C. -One of the Planet's Most Massive Volcanic Explosions »

December 09, 2008

"So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish!" -A Saturn Moon Teaming with Organic Chemicals: A Galaxy Insight

219290main_pia10361a516_3 NASA's Cassini spacecraft discovered a surprising organic brew erupting in geyser-like fashion from Saturn's moon Enceladus during a close flyby on March 12. Scientists are stunned that this tiny moon is so active, "hot" and teeming with water vapor and organic chemicals.

"Enceladus has got warmth, water and organic chemicals, some of the essential building blocks needed for life," said Dennis Matson, Cassini project scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "We have quite a recipe for life on our hands, but we have yet to find the final ingredient, liquid water, but Enceladus is only whetting our appetites for more."

Can fish be far behind?

"A completely unexpected surprise is that the chemistry of Enceladus, what's coming out from inside, resembles that of a comet," said Hunter Waite, principal investigator at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. "To have primordial material coming out from inside a Saturn moon raises many questions on the formation of the Saturn system."

"Enceladus is by no means a comet. Comets have tails and orbit the sun, and Enceladus' activity is powered by internal heat while comet activity is powered by sunlight. Enceladus' brew is like carbonated water with an essence of natural gas," said Waite.

The Casssini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer saw a much higher density of volatile gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide, as well as organic materials, some 20 times denser than expected. This dramatic increase in density was evident as the spacecraft flew over the area of the plumes.

New high-resolution heat maps of the south pole by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer show that the so-called tiger stripes, giant fissures that are the source of the geysers, are warm along almost their entire lengths, and reveal other warm fissures nearby. The warmest regions along the tiger stripes correspond to two of the jet locations seen in Cassini images.

"These spectacular new data will really help us understand what powers the geysers. The surprisingly high temperatures make it more likely that there's liquid water not far below the surface," said John Spencer, Cassini scientist on the Composite Infrared Spectrometer team at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colo.

Previous ultraviolet observations showed four jet sources, matching the locations of the plumes seen in previous images. This indicates that gas in the plume blasts off the surface into space, blending to form the larger plume.

At closest approach, Cassini was only 30 miles from Enceladus. When it flew through the plumes it was 120 miles from the moon's surface. Cassini's next flyby of Enceladus is in August.

The first step toward answering the question of whether life exists inside the subsurface aquifer of Enceladus is to analyze the organic compounds in the plume.  Cassini's March 12 passage through the plume provided some measurements that help us move toward an answer, and preliminary plans call for Cassini to fly through the plume again for more measurements in the future.  Ultimately, another mission in the future could conceivably land near the plume or even return plume material to Earth for laboratory analysis.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by JPL for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

Posted by Casey Kazan.

For images and more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/cassini or http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/ .

Comments

You misspelled "teeming".

to comment above!!

Who cares! finding new worlds dousnt involve spelling!

Known.....reported by NASA and Cassini web sites .

Indeed Enceladus is the most interesting moon of Saturn system.

Sorry for the aficionados of Titan...better Enceladus to try to seek life forms.

Regards and happy new year.

To Paul:
You spelt "doesn't" incorrectly.


Post a comment

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341bf7f753ef00e5518f43b08834

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference "So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish!" -A Saturn Moon Teaming with Organic Chemicals: A Galaxy Insight:

» Descubren quimicos organicos en una luna de Saturno from meneame.net
La nave espacial Cassini descubrió una sorprendente mezcla orgánica en un géiser en erupción. Los científicos se sorprendieron de que esta pequeña luna (Enceladus) sea tan activa, caliente, este llena de vapor de agua y productos químicos (... [Read More]

« The End of Aging? Experts Point to Unknown Dangers: A Galaxy Classic | Main | Antarctica 207 B.C. -One of the Planet's Most Massive Volcanic Explosions »




1


2


3


4


5


6


7


8





9


11


12


13


14


15

Our Partners

technology partners

A


19


B

About Us/Privacy Policy

For more information on The Daily Galaxy and to contact us please visit this page.



E